Welcome to GenHelp

This website will become a series of posts on my methodology and results in using the various online genealogical sources. The way I plan to craft this, I have not found elsewhere online, though I must admit, I have not looked at all 3,000+ other genealogy blogs. So I think I will be doing something completely unique, but if not, I hope, at the least, I make it different from anyone else. This blog will work in tandem with the genealogy workshops I will begin leading at my local Church, Solid Rock, in Midland Georgia.

First up is a series on researching for Vermont vital records. While the online records are known, little is published about the provenance of those databases, the origin of the images and facts they contain, an analysis of the veracity of the information, or how to use the information you find in your future research. I hope to cover all of this during January 2016!

Vermont Vital Records Research
Researchers of Vermont ancestors are fortunate to be able to access comprehensive vital records online for people who were born, married or died in the State of Vermont. I find these records invaluable in research of my own Vermont branches, and feel this would be a good data collection for me to provide examples and tips for better searching, analyzing and recording these types of sources. Even if your research doesn’t involve Vermont ancestors I believe you can learn from this series of posts on how to better organize, collect, record, analyze, and craft your genealogical research.

Genealogical Source Analysis
Source analysis is an important step in genealogical research. While it’s often the first thing discussed by professional genealogists, it’s almost always the last thing amateur genealogists perform. It’s usually left for the time when a researcher, suffering from the effects of the “shaking leaf syndrome,” realize that they’ve attached all these people to their family tree, and all these events to those people, yet some of the facts and events of their ancestors lives simply don’t add up. And then they begin to doubt whether a person in their tree really is an ancestor. Don’t wait for that time… begin now, at the start of 2016, to first analyze a source before you use it.

Recent Posts

woman reading newspaper

5 Steps for Using Obituaries in Genealogy

Obituaries can be a valuable resource for genealogy research, as they often provide detailed information about an individual’s life, including birth and death dates, family members, and occupation. Here are 5 steps for using obituaries in genealogy research:
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Levels of Confidence

How I Describe Levels of Conviction in Genealogical Research

In genealogical research facts often have a way of becoming factoids once new evidence weighs against the old hypothesis. As a genealogist, we should stay away from declaring a research subject absolute and finished – instead we should quantify our analysis of the evidence by prefacing our statements with qualifiers.
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Person Detail Page for Joseph Martel

Vermont, Births and Christenings, 1765-1908

This is part 2 of the Series: Vermont Vital Records Research. It is an in-depth look at the Vermont, Births and Christenings, 1765-1908 collection found at FamilySearch.org, with examples and tips for better searching, analyzing and recording this collection. When you are finished with this article I hope that you will…
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What is the Provenance of Vermont Vital Records?

The first thing a researcher should do when encountering a database is to find out the provenance of the original source. Establishing provenance is a needed step in the Data Collection Standard as published by the BCG. For genealogists, we would want to identify the record of ownership of the…
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Quote from Robert Charles Anderson

Genealogical Source Analysis

Source analysis is an important step in the genealogical research process. While it’s often the first thing discussed by professional genealogists, it’s almost always the last thing amateur genealogists perform. It’s usually left for the time when a researcher, suffering from the effects of the “shaking leaf syndrome,” realize that…
Read More
Marriage record for Moses Greenia and Rosa Sault

Vermont Vital Records Research

Researchers of Vermont ancestors are fortunate to be able to access comprehensive vital records online for people who were born, married or died in the State of Vermont. I find these records invaluable in research of my own Vermont branches, and feel this would be a good data collection for…
Read More